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In Embird Alphabets, the available connection types are:

Floating Stitches - the needle jumps from the end of one letter to the beginning of the next letter without inserting stitches between the letters.  Also called a "jump stitch". If you are using a commercial embroidery file format (such as .DST) the embroidery machine will trim threads at these jumps. This option makes for the best-looking, but slowest embroidery of lettering.

Floating Stitches (Solid) - the needle jumps from the end of one letter to the beginning of the next without inserting stitches between the letters. Also called a "jump stitch". If using a commercial embroidery file format such as .DST, the embroidery machine WILL NOT trim threads at these jumps unless a color change is also required. This option makes for faster embroidery of lettering, but leaves visible jump stitches between letters. Generally, these are short enough to be inconspicuous.

 Most home embroidery machines will automatically trim jumps that exceed a certain length and will not trim jumps that are shorter than that specific length. Therefore, for home embroidery machines these first, two options produce the same results.

Running Stitches (Closest Point) - the needle finishes each letter at the point closest to the next letter, then sews a solid line of stitches to the start point of the next letter.  This produces the fastest embroidery of the three options. Running stitches are less conspicuous than un-trimmed jump stitches over the same-sized gaps.

In Studio (Digitizing Tools) connection objects are always running stitches, but stitch length can be adjusted. Inserting a connection object connects the end point of the previous object to the start point of the current object without a trim or jump stitch, which greatly speeds up embroidery - even in machines that automatically trim for jumps. Connection objects can be routed so that they will be covered up by embroidery that's sewn later, or so that they inconspicuously skirt the edges of areas of embroidery.

 

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Copyright 2007 Stitched With Grace, Custom Embroidery and Designs
Last modified: 11/23/07